An interview with Ibrahim Binego professional dancer (Digital Cover)

Ibrah for TheZoom / Photo by Josue

Twenty-three year old, Ibrahim Binego’s passion for dancing lit­erally changes his life. Living in Nyamirambo, Kigali born unto Rwanda, Ibrah’s passion and drive for business was always con­stant. “The way dance makes me feel – I can’t find anywhere else. Although dance is very visual for the audience, the dancer experi­ences it in a completely different way. It is our goal to share what we feel with the audience”.

 

Ibrah says, his passion for dancing started out around 2009 when he moved to Burundi for a couple of years “When I was young I was addicted to football ” he didn’t quite know how to dance but loved the challenge of his new found obsession.

 

One of the things Ibrah would like to do is to open his own stu­dio and start sharing he’s gift to people. He says that he notices one little issue when teaching others, there is no representation of young Rwandan dancers. “I’d like to do my part to fix that as a respected dancer.” Feeling burnout as an artist is common, but Ibrah tackles it in a really necessary way. “I love travelling because sometimes I meet people with the same energy and vision as me.”

 

Ibrah admits that time management isn’t his strong suit, but regardless he remains dead-set on completing his tasks for the day. “From morning to night, I’m watching dancing videos, learning about running a successful dancing studio, teaching or dancing. That’s about 90 percent of my day. The other 10 percent I’m relaxing by watching movies, working out, or talking to friends. It’s pretty haphazard.”

 

Many professional dancers have inspired me to dance, especially Congolese dancers like koffie olomide. Ever since I was little, I knew dance was my passion and because of that, it has al­ways been my goal to become a professional dancer.

 

Performing on stage is like having a conver­sation with the audience. They can see even the smallest emotion and intent portrayed in my movement. There’s no intermediary “right word” to be found – my thoughts and feel­ings directly inspire movement, and there’s no wrong “definition” when it comes to movement. Even walking around the stage a certain way alerts them to the fact that I’m sad, or elated – whatever! And when there is no audience to watch on, that is the time that I get to check in with myself and let my body do the real talkin’. Because sometimes you don’t realize you feel something until it unexpectedly comes out.

 

Photo Credit / Josue for TheZoom

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How long have you been dancing?

 

I started dancing in 2009 when I moved to Burundi, and when I came back in 2011 I was recruited by Phantoms Crew as their teacher few months later I was leading the crew as “The King of Azonto” after three years in Phantoms crew, another crew called Krest Crew recruited me. In 2015 I was finally a member of Krest Crew till now

 

How does dance inspire you?

 

The way dance makes me feel – I can’t find anywhere else. Although dance is very visual for the audience, the dancer experiences it in a completely different way. It is our goal to share what we feel with the audience. Many professional dancers have inspired me to dance, especially Congolese dancers like koffie olomide. Ever since I was little, I knew dance was my passion and because of that, it has always been my goal to become a professional dancer.

 

Have you ever participated in a dance competition?

 

Yes, a lot of them per Example Dounda Style, Akadiho, on stage competition and It’s all about dance.

 

What are your hobbies and does this help you with your dancing?

 

I love exploring new areas. I think opening your mind to other places and ideas allows you to have more things to draw from when trying to express emotion or be creative in your dancing

 

What does dance taught you?

 

“Dance is Life” Dance taught me a lot of things such as Sacrifice, Dedication, Team work, Discipline, Determination, self-confidence and Creativity.

 

Do you have any dancers role models?

 

Chris Brown and Capella

 

How do you feel when you perform?

 

Dancing/performing on stage is like having a conversation with the audience. They can see even the smallest emotion and intent portrayed in my movement. There’s no intermediary “right word” to be found – my thoughts and feelings directly inspire movement, and there’s no wrong “definition” when it comes to movement. Even walking around the stage a certain way alerts them to the fact that I’m sad, or elated – whatever! And when there is no audience to watch on, that is the time that I get to check in with myself and let my body do the real talkin’. Because sometimes you don’t realize you feel something until it unexpectedly comes out.

 

What are your objectives as a dancer?

 

I would like to open my own dance studio to share my skills with others and I would like to travel Africa meeting people all around the world.

 

What else career would you pursuit if it’s wasn’t dancing?

 

Producer/Beat maker I would produce my own beat to dance on instead of dancing on someone else beat.

 

What is your favorite dance style?

 

Afro-Dance

Shema Abdoul
Shema Abdoul

Shema Abdoul is a creative currently residing in Kigali, he loves exploring new culture. He is motto is to always be true to yourself and others around you.